Women

Women

Of the four EEO target groups, women have achieved the most progress in their relative position in the New Zealand labour force. Yet, this progress has been quite limited, and equality with men in participation rates, pay, and seniority across occupational classes is a far-off goal. Most women are still clustered in lower paid jobs, at the bottom of occupational hierarchies in the labour force. Moreover, where progress for women has been achieved in some industrial sectors, it has often not been because women have improved their employment positions but because men's employment positions have worsened.

It is troubling that there is so much evidence of direct discrimination against women and of sexual harassment of women at work. As a first priority these practices should be eradicated. But indirect forms of discrimination also continue to hold women back. For example, the structuring of the workplace, the intensive nature of some training programmes, and the expectations of the hours people must work to obtain management positions can each serve to preserve competitive, male-dominated cultures. Such formal and informal institutional structures could be changed. But change is unlikely when the institutional power resides with those who most benefit from current arrangements.

 

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New Zealand Census of Women's Participation 2012 Download the full PDF of the report New Zealand Census of Women's Participation 2012 New Zealand Census of Women's Participation 2012

 

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'EEO progress for Women' - full chapter from Framework for the Future Either download the full PDF of the report (which will open bookmarked to the chapter on Women), or view the full chapter in an HTML page. Download Read

 

 
 
 
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